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Weekly Reflection - Epiphany

13 January 2022

Canon Peter

“I never made one of my discoveries through the process of rational thinking”
Albert Einstein

Archimedes (Greek mathematician born 287 BC) and Einstein (German Physicist born 1879) are famous for their epiphany moments – those sudden flashes of inspiration and insight that open up new horizons of thought and fuel the imagination. We all need those energising revelations to help us take steps forward, explore new horizons and live a life of faith. When was the last time that happened in your life?

This Sunday the cathedral will gather for Epiphany Carols at 15:30. It’s an opportunity to sit together as a community and seek God’s fresh revelation. Epiphany is a season of joy and expectation.

The epiphany we are celebrating is the revelation that God has visited his people. The birth of Jesus of Nazareth and his life of 33 years revealed to the world God’s love, goodness and presence in a unique way. An epiphany that continues its cascade of grace and love, transforming lives and communities.

Archimedes and Einstein cried “Eureka!” but that wasn’t the end of the story – they allowed the flash of inspiration to last and linger in a way that inspired profound discoveries.

How does the epiphany of Jesus inspire, last and linger in our lives?

One of the hymns we will sing this Sunday is by the Yorkshire hymn writer and poet James Montgomery (died in Sheffield 1854). Montgomery studied theology at Fulneck near Leeds, he was a baker in Mirfield and a storekeeper in Wath-Upon-Dearne. His life in Yorkshire provided a context for him to encounter the love of Christ, serve his community and leave a lasting legacy of poetry and hymns. Here’s some of his words that might help you seek a fresh epiphany for 2022. Why not come and sing them with us on Sunday…

Hail to the Lord’s Anointed!
Great David’s greater Son;
hail, in the time appointed,
His reign on earth begun!
He comes to break oppression,
to set the captive free;
to take away transgression,
and rule in equity.

He comes with succour speedy
to those who suffer wrong;
to help the poor and needy,
and bid the weak be strong;
to give them songs for sighing,
their darkness turn to light,
whose souls, condemned and dying,
were precious in his sight.

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